Backdating of stock option grants

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Those include Altera, Applied Micro Circuits, Asyst Technologies, CNET Networks (publisher of CNET News.com), Equinix, Foundry Networks, Intuit, Marvell Technology Group, RSA Security and Veri Sign.

In addition, and The Cheesecake Factory have announced their own, preemptive investigations. Stock options give the recipient the right to buy a share of a company's stock at a price called the strike price, which is equal to the value of the stock on a certain date.

At least that seems to be the conclusion reached by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission regarding their first case against executives charged with fraud related to backdating.

That promise is considered to be an in-the-money options grant.

In-the-money options are different from performance-based compensation in the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service and the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

(In 2004, FAS 123 was revised to require that all stock-option grants be expensed.) Brocade’s crime, charges the Do J, is that between 20, company executives “routinely backdated stock option grants to give employees favorably priced options without recording necessary compensation expenses.” Ultimately, the alleged criminal fraud is a disclosure and accounting issue that violates Section 10 (Manipulative and Deceptive Devices) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

The Do J claims that by not properly accounting for the options expenses, the company’s financial condition was misrepresented to investors. Tax Code, a company can take up to a

At least that seems to be the conclusion reached by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission regarding their first case against executives charged with fraud related to backdating.

That promise is considered to be an in-the-money options grant.

In-the-money options are different from performance-based compensation in the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service and the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

(In 2004, FAS 123 was revised to require that all stock-option grants be expensed.) Brocade’s crime, charges the Do J, is that between 20, company executives “routinely backdated stock option grants to give employees favorably priced options without recording necessary compensation expenses.” Ultimately, the alleged criminal fraud is a disclosure and accounting issue that violates Section 10 (Manipulative and Deceptive Devices) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

The Do J claims that by not properly accounting for the options expenses, the company’s financial condition was misrepresented to investors. Tax Code, a company can take up to a $1 million deduction for performance-based compensation awarded to “covered” executives.

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At least that seems to be the conclusion reached by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission regarding their first case against executives charged with fraud related to backdating.That promise is considered to be an in-the-money options grant.In-the-money options are different from performance-based compensation in the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service and the Financial Accounting Standards Board.(In 2004, FAS 123 was revised to require that all stock-option grants be expensed.) Brocade’s crime, charges the Do J, is that between 20, company executives “routinely backdated stock option grants to give employees favorably priced options without recording necessary compensation expenses.” Ultimately, the alleged criminal fraud is a disclosure and accounting issue that violates Section 10 (Manipulative and Deceptive Devices) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.The Do J claims that by not properly accounting for the options expenses, the company’s financial condition was misrepresented to investors. Tax Code, a company can take up to a $1 million deduction for performance-based compensation awarded to “covered” executives.

million deduction for performance-based compensation awarded to “covered” executives.

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